TECHNOLOGY

TECHNOLOGY

CLIMATE CITY relies on an airborne measurement system whose strategic core are the “CLIMATE BIRDS”, captive balloons equipped with a payload for measuring the physical and chemical phenomena of the atmosphere; phenomena that characterize the urban climate and whose observation can be carried out between 150 and 1500 meters of altitude.

The first balloon deployed in a city’s atmosphere is called C-Birds One. This is a demonstrator of the CLIMATE BIRDS network, which will demonstrate the proper functioning of the system and define the exact number of balloon to deploy over the city, in operational phase.

These balloons will then be installed permanently, but with great agility whether in the context of a grounding system as part of a change in the implementation of the network.

CLIMATE CITY HELPS CITIES TO ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE.

Discover in this video the operation of our operator.

BALLOON

This balloon – C-Birds One in the demonstration phase and CLIMATE BIRDS in the “operational network” phase – is the result of A-NSE’s Research and Development activities. It flies at an average altitude of 350 metres and its operation fully complies with civil aviation requirements and the specific constraints relating to safety and urban comfort. It can carry up to 30 kg of payload, including several devices to observe the physical, dynamic and thermal characteristics on the ground and the first 300 vertical metres of the atmosphere.

It can be manoeuvred in winds of up to 70 km/h, brought back down in less than 15 minutes and moved around using a mobile ground segment.

DRONE

This UAV, with a wingspan of 4.2 metres, can travel to a distance of 1,000 km, reach an altitude of 4,500 metres, attain a maximum speed of 80 mph and carry a payload of up to 8 kg.

Thanks to its 10 hours of autonomy, the drone allows mobile measurements to be collected continuously.

These measurements are recorded on board and then transmitted to the ground.

This UAV is used to conduct measurement campaigns (especially advection measurements over the urban periphery. Meanwhile, the captive balloon fleet is deployed permanently.

PAYLOAD

The main sensors making up the payload integrated into the balloon basket are as follows:

  • On-site probes to determine the size and concentrations of fine particlesand gaseous pollutants (NOx, ozone, CO, etc.)
  • A weather sensor (temperature, humidity, wind, etc.)
  • A radar laser measuring the vertical profile of the wind and turbulence
  • Thermal cameras to analyse the surfacecondition and water content

ANALYSIS

The data are analysed as part of a processing chain that begins with data storage, organisation and mapping – a first stage processed using the GEOSTORM CLIMATE CITY software developed by the CS group, CLIMATE CITY’s strategic partner. They are then analysed through a scientific intervention based on international cooperation orchestrated by the CLIMATE CITY Scientific and Operational Committee, led by Professor Yves Tourre (Co-Founder of CLIMATE CITY) and Roger Solari (Co-Chair of the Committee). NASA and Columbia University laboratories, collaborative projects with CNES, and multiple scientific and technical organisations ensure the quality of the Committee’s work.

The subsequent analyses are conducted on the basis of variability of both historic climate data and the local chronological order obtained by the C-Birds One and CLIMATE BIRDS networks over 3 to 6 months to filter and extract the frequencies and intensities of the various urban phenomena over a daily and seasonal timescale.

BALLOON

This balloon – C-Birds One in the demonstration phase and CLIMATE BIRDS in the “operational network” phase – is the result of A-NSE’s Research and Development activities. It flies at an average altitude of 350 metres and its operation fully complies with civil aviation requirements and the specific constraints relating to safety and urban comfort. It can carry up to 30 kg of payload, including several devices to observe the physical, dynamic and thermal characteristics on the ground and the first 300 vertical metres of the atmosphere.

It can be manoeuvred in winds of up to 70 km/h, brought back down in less than 15 minutes and moved around using a mobile ground segment.

DRONE

This UAV, with a wingspan of 4.2 metres, can travel to a distance of 1,000 km, reach an altitude of 4,500 metres, attain a maximum speed of 80 mph and carry a payload of up to 8 kg.

Thanks to its 10 hours of autonomy, the drone allows mobile measurements to be collected continuously.

These measurements are recorded on board and then transmitted to the ground.

This UAV is used to conduct measurement campaigns (especially advection measurements over the urban periphery. Meanwhile, the captive balloon fleet is deployed permanently.

PAYLOAD

The main sensors making up the payload integrated into the balloon basket are as follows:

  • On-site probes to determine the size and concentrations of fine particlesand gaseous pollutants (NOx, ozone, CO, etc.)
  • A weather sensor (temperature, humidity, wind, etc.)
  • A radar laser measuring the vertical profile of the wind and turbulence
  • Thermal cameras to analyse the surfacecondition and water content

ANALYSIS

The data are analysed as part of a processing chain that begins with data storage, organisation and mapping – a first stage processed using the GEOSTORM CLIMATE CITY software developed by the CS group, CLIMATE CITY’s strategic partner. They are then analysed through a scientific intervention based on international cooperation orchestrated by the CLIMATE CITY Scientific and Operational Committee, led by Professor Yves Tourre (Co-Founder of CLIMATE CITY) and Roger Solari (Co-Chair of the Committee). NASA and Columbia University laboratories, collaborative projects with CNES, and multiple scientific and technical organisations ensure the quality of the Committee’s work.

The subsequent analyses are conducted on the basis of variability of both historic climate data and the local chronological order obtained by the C-Birds One and CLIMATE BIRDS networks over 3 to 6 months to filter and extract the frequencies and intensities of the various urban phenomena over a daily and seasonal timescale.